#WeAreWE

#WeAreWE

The Women's Equality Party is a new collaborative force in British politics uniting people of all genders, diverse ages, backgrounds, ethnicities, beliefs and experiences in the shared determination to see women enjoy the same rights and opportunities as men so that all can flourish.

WE are here to give voice to all those who share our belief that equality is better for everyone.

Meet your fellow supporters and campaigners below and tell us why you are WE.

Please check your e-mail for a link to activate your account.

Because I have three daughters

I want them to grow up in a more equal world which will be better for women and men

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Because I'm a born feminist

I have 5 brothers. I've spent my life fighting sexism: "So he can do that but I'm not allowed?" No. "Because he's got a penis?" Well, no, not because of that... "But he can do it & he has a willy, I can't do it because I've got a vagina?" Well... "But a willy's more likely to get in the way when you're climbing trees, my vagina's all tucked away so it won't -" You just can't, alright? I wanted to work with Shire Horses. "You can't, you're too short" I'm 5'0". I said: "Don't you tell me I'm too short, 9 year old boys worked these horses in Victorian times!" "You're not strong enough." Really? And you could stop a Shire if it got a gallop up? No, you couldn't. "We haven't got a vacancy." I'll do a training course. "There isn't one." So I made one. NVQ Level 2 in Heavy Horse Management & Driving. Passed with honours, got punched by the boss when I objected to him sticking his penis into my back & then I was sacked. But I did it! When men said I couldn't, I damned well did & I've more balls than any of them!

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Because I'm fighting to be equal when I grow up, and I don't want the next generation to have to

Although I'm only 17 I've always been very aware of the world around me, both politically and within the media, and it's become incredibly clear to me that something needs to change. I've considered myself a feminist since I was about 10 and able to understand what the word meant, and it both shocked and scared me that in a recent Media Studies lesson (in a room full of 17-19 year olds) I was the only person that believed that women are not yet equal. We need to ensure that everyone is aware of their environment, and that although gender equality has progressed, we're far from equal.

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Because I'm tired of receiving letters from local estate agents ...

addressed to my son, and asking if he would like to sell MY house! Have a look at the electoral roll by all means - I don't mind - but some seriously troubling assumptions STILL being made in 2015! #everyday sexism ...

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Because inequality is scandalous and self-defeating

At work, at home, out socialising, all the time, I see women doing brilliant things, offering incredible opinions, starting and then tending wonderfully constructive relationships, creating organisations and slowly but surely changing the world for the better. Yet everyday I feel incredible frustration when I see my female friends and colleagues being patronised, ignored and overridden. For a forward-thinking, peaceful, prosperous and progressive world, I believe we need women involved, speaking and leading. For some reason that hasn't happened yet but by joining WE, I want to play a part in changing it.

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Because inequality just isn't acceptable to me; it never has been.

I've always been labeled as being a bit 'militant' but really I never have been; i just can't stand to see people being treated differently and I've always stood by that whether it be different treatment due to gender, preferences, colour, socio economic background, wealth, tastes, percieved attractiveness, or where you come from. It's just unfathomable. There's inequality everywhere, little things, subtler things so engrained in our culture we don't notice. I gently educate my colleagues and friends every time they act in a way that exacerbates inequality. And now we have the vehicle to do it on a much wider scale and really address it once and for all. So that why I'm here!

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Because it is time.

I've been fortunate to have had a childhood where I was given the impression I could be anyone and do anything. That confidence has served me well through my forty odd years but I can, like all women, easily pick out a dozen instances, off the top of my pretty (but empty) little head, where I’ve encountered direct inequality. Mostly my experience has been with the casual sexism that has become part of our language, the throw away comments about women being weak (physically and therefore mentally and emotionally) or ‘family men’ being given more resources, respect and pay than working mothers by comparison. I’ve raised the odd comment in rebuttal but I mostly just let it slide, easier in the long run, I keep telling myself. I find it deeply saddening that inequality has become so ingrained in our society that on some level all women understand (and almost accept) that they will be treated as less than their male counterparts. After time the imbalance becomes the norm and social structures become reinforced. Equality rights affect everyone, think of how much stronger our nation and our world will be if everyone could take their place as equals. You can't sing with half a voice, you can't have vision with half an eye and you can't have a whole society without half the people being heard. Despite the backlash we need to find our voices. Up the women! (but obviously not higher than the men, just high enough to be equal. If we could sneak a brief period of dominance that would be great but let’s not run before we walk).

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Because it is time.

The unprecedented opportunities of the world we are currently living in, the un-knowable complexities of the planet our children will inherit, demand a political system that dares to grow up: intellectually, emotionally, creatively and spiritually. We need everyone around the table. We need to be able to speak to each other. We need to be able to hear each other. And then, we need the wisdom, the courage and determination to move united into action that is purposeful, innovative, robust but malleable. It is time for us to embrace, nurture and celebrate all of who we are as a nation. It is time to educate, empower and engage all our citizens so that each of us may have an equal stake in the visioning and continual ‘becoming’ of our nation.

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Because it's time to end lip service to equality.

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Because I want an equal society for my kids to grow up in regardless of their gender

When I had daughters as well as a son I saw what I'd stopped noticing; that our society is massively unequal and my children will have different opportunities and societal expectations based not on their abilities but on their gender. I think that #WE can change this.

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Because I want both girls and boys to be proud to call themselves feminists

I'm tired of feeling like a lone voice speaking up for women amongst a sea of white men in authority

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Because I want everyone to flourish. Because WE have to stop violence against women.

WE must ensure all women, in the UK and internationally, can enjoy their sexual and reproductive health and rights - these are the foundation of a life of dignity and the ability to realise our potential.

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Because I was Wrong

I remember sitting in my high school history class, and my teacher, Beth Starichino, desperately trying to encourage me to join a Women’s Rights organization. At the time, I was stupid and claimed that women had equal rights, at least in the western world. I’ll never forget the look on her face, when she said, “when you’re older, you’ll think differently.” At the time, I laughed, the way any sixteen year girl that got good grades and had a sense of entitlement would laugh at such a statement, having no clue what discrimination looked like, either as a woman or as a person with a disability. I’m joining the Women’s Equality Party because it’s taken me sixteen years to to admit to myself, to the world, to her, that’s she’s right. It’s taken me sixteen years to admit that there’s something wrong when co-workers call me irrational just because I stand up for my ideas. There is something wrong when the boy I’m dating calls me ‘a proud woman’ and says it like it’s a bad thing. There is something wrong in this world where we can not find a reasonable way to provide new mothers with affordable childcare, where a woman still has to make a decision whether or not to chase her own dreams in the career of her choosing or to be a mom. Where girls at the age of twelve or thirteen would rather be pretty than smart, and where it has been scientifically proven that if a man behaves one way, he is called assertive, but if a woman behaves the same way, she is called a bitch. I joined the Women’s Equality Party in the UK because I want to make history and make sure that for the next generation, when they talk about equal rights between the genders, they can say that this fight is over, and the teacher will agree that they are right.

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Because representation should not be a struggle

Politics still looks like a boys club, women are still criticised for their looks no matter how they present. LGBT+ people are still marginalised and people of colour still face discrimination on every level. We are all human, we should all be equal. As bell hooks said, feminism is for everybody, so our government and culture should reflect everybody.

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Because the current sitation for girls and women is rediculous

I recently became a mother for the first time to a little girl. I was utterly staggered to witness the enormity of gender stereotyping that happens at children, right from birth. I naively thought this wouldn't be the case, what with it being 2015 an' all that. Plonker. It's rife. Having never been politically active before, I decided to become a Founding Member to combat this ridiculous notion that girls are less than. I want my daughter to grow up seeing Mummy putting actions to her beliefs. I want to "never grow a wishbone where my backbone ought to be" - Clementine Paddleford.

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Because the moment a woman has a voice, she is still vilified

I never considered myself a feminist, mainly because I believed in the hype that you read about so called "feminazis" (I hate that word). It was around the time that Caroline Criado-Perez campaigned to have a woman on a bank note that I started to talk note, and realised that I was in fact a feminist too. I also noted with horror the sheer torrent of abuse that she received because of it. Rape and death threats for wanting a woman on a bank note? More recently we have Charlotte Proudman. Whilst personally I would not have shared the man's details, she was perfectly in her right to do so. In response she has been dragged through the press, had her family estate publicized, every Facebook conversation scrutinized since the beginning of time and has received death threats. For calling out a man on being sexist? I believe in feminism because I want equality. Because I want women to have a voice and not to be afraid to say what they think for fair of threats of rape and death. Until this is achieved, we will never be equal. S

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Because there is so much overt AND insidious discrimination against women

And it's driving me mad! I have too many conversations with well-meaning people which fall apart because of semantics and nuance. I love that the Women's Equality Party offers a clear vision of what we need to achieve for an equal society - who can argue with the merit of any one of the six objectives? - and through it, we can reach so many people who are otherwise divded on gender equality issues.

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Published and promoted by Hannah Peaker on behalf of the Women's Equality Party
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