#WeAreWE

#WeAreWE

The Women's Equality Party is a new collaborative force in British politics uniting people of all genders, diverse ages, backgrounds, ethnicities, beliefs and experiences in the shared determination to see women enjoy the same rights and opportunities as men so that all can flourish.

WE are here to give voice to all those who share our belief that equality is better for everyone.

Meet your fellow supporters and campaigners below and tell us why you are WE.

Please check your e-mail for a link to activate your account.

Inequality has become less obvious, but it is still pervasive

I don't remember anyone telling me i couldn't become whatever I wanted to become as I grew up in the eighties and for that reason it has taken me a long time to realise that I was brought up unequal but as an adult looking back I realise i was gently moulded by those around me to become what they considered lady-like. I really hate that term 'lady-like'; It suggests that wanting to mess with computers, to get covered in mud playing sports, to have more interest in the engineering principles taught by Meccano and Lego than the humdrum life of your inanimate Barbie Doll is somehow inappropriate for a girl or lady. I have a one year old daughter of my own called Aria, partly after the Character in the 'A Song of Ice and Fire' series. Aria is a great namesake, she is willful, independent and focused. As a mother I aim to give Aria the opportunities I didn't have and try to help her be ready for an adult life that may be quite different to how we live now. I want her to have the confidence I have lacked and the ambition to do things with her life. I hope she will forgive me for buying her Meccano for Christmas when her friends have tiny tears dolls, for buying her the cute red, blue or green jumper or dress instead of the tacky pink crap that is persistently pushed on us by major companies. I hope she will forgive me for being uninterested in makeup and celebrities, 'women's' magazines and other 'women's' interests. For me, being a woman isn't for anyone else to define, to use to categorise me into a neat demographic pool. It is part of what makes me, me but it isn't the be all and end all of who i am. This is why, I believe in equality for women.

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Inequality has become less obvious, but it is still pervasive

I don't remember anyone telling me i couldn't become whatever I wanted to become as I grew up in the eighties and for that reason it has taken me a long time to realise that I was brought up unequal but as an adult looking back I realise i was gently moulded by those around me to become what they considered lady-like. I really hate that term 'lady-like'; It suggests that wanting to mess with computers, to get covered in mud playing sports, to have more interest in the engineering principles taught by Meccano and Lego than the humdrum life of your inanimate Barbie Doll is somehow inappropriate for a girl or lady. I have a one year old daughter of my own called Aria, partly after the Character in the 'A Song of Ice and Fire' series. Aria is a great namesake, she is willful, independent and focused. As a mother I aim to give Aria the opportunities I didn't have and try to help her be ready for an adult life that may be quite different to how we live now. I want her to have the confidence I have lacked and the ambition to do things with her life. I hope she will forgive me for buying her Meccano for Christmas when her friends have tiny tears dolls, for buying her the cute red, blue or green jumper or dress instead of the tacky pink crap that is persistently pushed on us by major companies. I hope she will forgive me for being uninterested in makeup and celebrities, 'women's' magazines and other 'women's' interests. For me, being a woman isn't for anyone else to define, to use to categorise me into a neat demographic pool. It is part of what makes me, me but it isn't the be all and end all of who i am. This is why, I believe in equality for women.

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Inequality has become less obvious, but it is still pervasive

I don't remember anyone telling me i couldn't become whatever I wanted to become as I grew up in the eighties and for that reason it has taken me a long time to realise that I was brought up unequal but as an adult looking back I realise i was gently moulded by those around me to become what they considered lady-like. I really hate that term 'lady-like'; It suggests that wanting to mess with computers, to get covered in mud playing sports, to have more interest in the engineering principles taught by Meccano and Lego than the humdrum life of your inanimate Barbie Doll is somehow inappropriate for a girl or lady. I have a one year old daughter of my own called Aria, partly after the Character in the 'A Song of Ice and Fire' series. Aria is a great namesake, she is willful, independent and focused. As a mother I aim to give Aria the opportunities I didn't have and try to help her be ready for an adult life that may be quite different to how we live now. I want her to have the confidence I have lacked and the ambition to do things with her life. I hope she will forgive me for buying her Meccano for Christmas when her friends have tiny tears dolls, for buying her the cute red, blue or green jumper or dress instead of the tacky pink crap that is persistently pushed on us by major companies. I hope she will forgive me for being uninterested in makeup and celebrities, 'women's' magazines and other 'women's' interests. For me, being a woman isn't for anyone else to define, to use to categorise me into a neat demographic pool. It is part of what makes me, me but it isn't the be all and end all of who i am. This is why, I believe in equality for women.

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Inequality is one of the most fundamental challenges of the 21st Century

I have always felt passionate about supporting equality and embracing diversity. I trained as a women's personal development trainer and coach so I could help women from a range of different backgrounds develop confidence in themselves and challenge discrimination. Similarly I joined the WE party as it speaks to my core values. There are so many issues that I want to see spoken up for by everyone especially men in order to bring an end to these abuses of human rights ie gender violence, gender pay gap etc. I am particularly keen to support BME women who face the dual barriers of gender and race inequality in preventing their advancement in society and the workplace.

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Inspire confidence in girls and boys

There are so many reasons that I am WE, but when I think about it most of them stem back to confidence, or lack of. I want WE to help girls and boys grow into confident women and men, in a society where they feel able to be who and what they want to be. WE can help to change the social structure that constrains both sexes in education and work, through to media and fashion. Despite popular rhetoric to the contrary, we don't live in a post-feminist society and WE is here to remind us of this. I want to keep pushing for equality so that my children are free to be themselves, and are inspired and confident enough to challenge the world around them and keep pushing the boundaries, so that their children don't have to.

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I saw an article in the news about the gender pay gap, and it made me angry

My niece was born about this time last year, and a few months later I saw the article in The Guardian about how it would take another 70 years to close the gender pay gap. This prompted me to look into other gender issues and I realised that I didn't want my niece to grow up in this world where women are still treated as second class citizens. I got angry, mostly at myself. Angry that I had just accepted gender inequality and not done anything to try and change it. I don't want my niece to grow up the same. I started to hear talk of WE and I knew that I had to join, that I had to get involved. So I did

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I set up OBJECT vs objectification of women. Then STAND UP FOR WOMEN, the ‘Comic Relief’ for women.

WE has huge potential to be BIG and make real impact. Very keen to work with you and help achieve that. And, of course, you have a potentially huge resource with the many, many women (and men!) and women's groups with incredible skills and talents and drive who would be in support... GO #WE !

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I shouldn't be told that I can't walk home alone, as if it's my fault (and so much more)

I'm 18 years old and have just moved to university. For the last 7 years of my life, I have been at an all girls school. There was one particular girl who inspired me to join this party. She was not afraid to stand up for womens rights and really opened my eyes to the problems that still exist. Since arriving at uni, I have already been harassed three times whilst walking to class by men driving past in cars. It astounds me how they believe this is acceptable behaviour to exhibit in front of hundreds of students in broad daylight. WEP is needed, however sad that fact may be and I am so happy to have finally found a party that truly reflect my views. Thank you :)

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I suppose I was a latent feminist....

... until I found Twitter, discovered feminist writers and was caught up in NoMorePage3, appalled by EverydaySexism and then swept up in the enthusiasm around the beginning of WE. I've worked in a predominantly male environment for 40 years and in that time we've only had two women on the Board, and none in recent years, so I think it's crucial to tackle the educational and cultural bias that stops girls taking up STEM subjects, but also to challenge the perception that only those with technical training can manage technical organisations.... and that only women are capable of taking minutes and arranging meetings. I really hope WE can do this.

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I think the world would be a better place if it was run according to a feminine agenda.

Women (and men) are still subject to discrimination if they prioritise family over work - deprivation in the form of monetary hardship and loss of dignity due to lack of respect for the job they are doing. This is because financial support (generally prioritised by men) is given more value in today's world than emotional support (which is generally prioritised by women.) Feminism has a long way to go, as the equality women have gained is assessed through the eyes of men - there is no equality for the feminine approach. A feminine (more caring) approach would also be the best way to address the mental health crisis.

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I thought I was alone....

... but here you all are! Each comment I have read here rings true. WE are united by common experiences that cut through the bullsh*t we have all been fed; delivered by a system that is innately biased against us. Enough already! Alone, we are attacked, maligned and discriminated against for our simple request for equality. Together we are a force that no-one can ignore....

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I thought the fight was over

But then I realised that the patriarchy had just got better at disguising inequality and belittling those who stood against it. I will not rest until women are proportionally represented in the House of Commons and House of Lords, not just the 22% we have currently. Until female CEOs head more than just 5% of the UKs top 100 largest companies. Until the culture of victim blaming is abolished and more than 1% of rapists are bought to justice. So that my nieces and future female generations can grow up in a safer, fairer world, not one where they are objectified and treated purely as an ornament.

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It is about time

It is about time to put end to all the horror women go through: violence, sexual harassment, rapes, prostitution It is about time that house care is shared as well as fair payment, great careers and opportunities out there It is about time that people will be treated as humans, no matter what gender they got And I don't see our fellow men who got the power putting this at the top of their agenda. Go Sisters <3

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It is all about empowerment not entitlement

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It is time for a transparent party dedicated to equality of opportunity

British politics is desperately in need of a totally fair and transparent party, supporting a change in balance for women.

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It's never too late to care about Women's Rights!

Although not quite as old as some of the other founders I am nevertheless a recent convert at the age of 46. For every woman who makes it how many have been left behind?

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It's not okay to criticise my vagina if you disagree with me

Recently, a photograph of a group of teenage girls in shorts and bikini tops and another of a pouting teenager in a similar outfit turned up in my facebook feed. They were labelled 'slags' and the caption said they were thirteen. Rather than quietly deleting them, I commented that sexualising young people says more about those calling them slags than it does about the people in the photograph. I also said that there is no justification for calling any woman a slag because women have the right to enjoy sex just as men do. Apparently, I was missing the point and it was all just a bit of fun - and, besides, they clearly were slags. Would I let my daughter dress like that? I tried to answer each point made to me, this drew the conversation into paedophilia and hebephilia and rape. I was then criticised for this - the person who asked the question was not. I was called a man-hater for saying that attitudes like 'they're asking for it' gave tacit approval to rapists. A woman - a WOMAN! - tried to insult me by calling me an angry feminist. I don't understand why she wasn't an angry feminist when our young people cannot dress as they please without being perved over ("I wonder how long I would get?!"). And told me I needed to get over it because we have the vote... Finally, I was told, by one commenter, that not only would he pour acid on me if I was on fire but that I was jealous because I was too old and shrivelled to be raped and, also, that I had a vagina like a wizard's sleeve. I gave the young man a quick science lesson about what, exactly, would happen, if he poured acid on a fire, informed him that I would tell the man who did rape me that he should check with this lad next time he felt like raping somebody and ignored the wizard's sleeve thing because I had had enough and didn't feel like getting into the whole stereotyping of wizards debate at that time. I dread the thought that my son might turn out like that young man.

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it's the time to fight unconscious bias

It is time that there is some positive discrimination towards women. WE represent more than half the population, yet there are hardly any of us in the top tiers in politics, CEO's, managerial positions,etc.... And it's not because we lack talent, it's because men unconsciously promote other men. The worst is a lot of men don't think that inequality exists, and that is even worse than the male chauvinists!

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It's time to do things differently.....

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