#WeAreWE

#WeAreWE

The Women's Equality Party is a new collaborative force in British politics uniting people of all genders, diverse ages, backgrounds, ethnicities, beliefs and experiences in the shared determination to see women enjoy the same rights and opportunities as men so that all can flourish.

WE are here to give voice to all those who share our belief that equality is better for everyone.

Meet your fellow supporters and campaigners below and tell us why you are WE.

Please check your e-mail for a link to activate your account.

WE is as near as we have to 'the' answer

Life is complicated. There are no simple answers to the multiplicity of problems that people, groups, and societies face. But given the transformative, multiplying effect that small advances in equality can have - like a form of homeopathy that actually works - supporting WE is the best way to promote changes that we all need.

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Because Things need to Change - No More Masters of the Universe!

All my working life I've seen women propping up men in the workplace. Offering up initiatives the men then take the credit for, together with the promotion AND the accompanying pay scale. They come into the workplace green as grass, they pick your brains and then suddenly they're listened to whilst you were never taken seriously. If there's a job going previously occupied by a male, and you're up for the position - they will offer it to you, of course, because you have the expertise and they need that - but the 'title' of the job will be changed, i.e. executive instead of manager, and the pay scale, of course, will be much lower! Then there's the 'old boy network' which I've had to put up with for years, along with all the condescension which goes along with it. Masters of the Universe, and capable of not much really. Thankfully this breed is dying out, but not fast enough for me. I'm not anti-men, not by a long shot. Just pro-justice. Fairness for every segment of our society has been addressed by the PC brigade but the women's cause is still bottom of the priority list, not taken seriously. After all, we've let it go on this long haven't we? The gals are still the ones sat at the front desk while the guys are, on the whole, the most likely to get the seat at the big desk.... Let's stop being emotional about this and get the laws tightened over women's employment rights, once and for all!

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When I look back and then forward in time

I am 51 and do not want the younger generation to put up with the everyday inequality I grew up with, across my life and work, expectations and opportunities. It seems that its not possible to be a silver fox(y) - now I get both age and gender bias. This is not the future I want to leave for my fellow beings andI can no longer rage in silence.

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When I look at my Granddaughter

I am troubled that the world hasn't moved any further towards equality than since I was a child. Until there is equal representation, girls will lack role models. Without role models; aspirations and ambition cannot grow. Without growth and education our world will stagnate in old ideas. This isn't good for women or men. That is why I am WE

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Throughout history men have taken control of women,

on the grounds that we are too irrational, weak or vulnerable to protect ourselves from violence and depredations of all kinds. This is an admirable sentiment and IF they ever manage it, they should let us know! Which ever bits one was born with, and how one uses them should be the concern of healthcare, and nothing else. It does not determine or require any other distinction in any other field.

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Because I am a woman. Because this Party should never be necessary.

I am WE because I want to: Empower Negate injustice Demonstrate Incite change Never give up until the fight is won Educate Question Unify Activate Liberate Inspire Transform Yield action I am WE!

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https://www.ted.com/talks/michael_kimmel_why_gender_equality_is_good_for_everyone_men_included

I think this TED talk says it all, and should be watched by all members and supporters!

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It's not okay to criticise my vagina if you disagree with me

Recently, a photograph of a group of teenage girls in shorts and bikini tops and another of a pouting teenager in a similar outfit turned up in my facebook feed. They were labelled 'slags' and the caption said they were thirteen. Rather than quietly deleting them, I commented that sexualising young people says more about those calling them slags than it does about the people in the photograph. I also said that there is no justification for calling any woman a slag because women have the right to enjoy sex just as men do. Apparently, I was missing the point and it was all just a bit of fun - and, besides, they clearly were slags. Would I let my daughter dress like that? I tried to answer each point made to me, this drew the conversation into paedophilia and hebephilia and rape. I was then criticised for this - the person who asked the question was not. I was called a man-hater for saying that attitudes like 'they're asking for it' gave tacit approval to rapists. A woman - a WOMAN! - tried to insult me by calling me an angry feminist. I don't understand why she wasn't an angry feminist when our young people cannot dress as they please without being perved over ("I wonder how long I would get?!"). And told me I needed to get over it because we have the vote... Finally, I was told, by one commenter, that not only would he pour acid on me if I was on fire but that I was jealous because I was too old and shrivelled to be raped and, also, that I had a vagina like a wizard's sleeve. I gave the young man a quick science lesson about what, exactly, would happen, if he poured acid on a fire, informed him that I would tell the man who did rape me that he should check with this lad next time he felt like raping somebody and ignored the wizard's sleeve thing because I had had enough and didn't feel like getting into the whole stereotyping of wizards debate at that time. I dread the thought that my son might turn out like that young man.

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Inequality has become less obvious, but it is still pervasive

I don't remember anyone telling me i couldn't become whatever I wanted to become as I grew up in the eighties and for that reason it has taken me a long time to realise that I was brought up unequal but as an adult looking back I realise i was gently moulded by those around me to become what they considered lady-like. I really hate that term 'lady-like'; It suggests that wanting to mess with computers, to get covered in mud playing sports, to have more interest in the engineering principles taught by Meccano and Lego than the humdrum life of your inanimate Barbie Doll is somehow inappropriate for a girl or lady. I have a one year old daughter of my own called Aria, partly after the Character in the 'A Song of Ice and Fire' series. Aria is a great namesake, she is willful, independent and focused. As a mother I aim to give Aria the opportunities I didn't have and try to help her be ready for an adult life that may be quite different to how we live now. I want her to have the confidence I have lacked and the ambition to do things with her life. I hope she will forgive me for buying her Meccano for Christmas when her friends have tiny tears dolls, for buying her the cute red, blue or green jumper or dress instead of the tacky pink crap that is persistently pushed on us by major companies. I hope she will forgive me for being uninterested in makeup and celebrities, 'women's' magazines and other 'women's' interests. For me, being a woman isn't for anyone else to define, to use to categorise me into a neat demographic pool. It is part of what makes me, me but it isn't the be all and end all of who i am. This is why, I believe in equality for women.

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Inequality has become less obvious, but it is still pervasive

I don't remember anyone telling me i couldn't become whatever I wanted to become as I grew up in the eighties and for that reason it has taken me a long time to realise that I was brought up unequal but as an adult looking back I realise i was gently moulded by those around me to become what they considered lady-like. I really hate that term 'lady-like'; It suggests that wanting to mess with computers, to get covered in mud playing sports, to have more interest in the engineering principles taught by Meccano and Lego than the humdrum life of your inanimate Barbie Doll is somehow inappropriate for a girl or lady. I have a one year old daughter of my own called Aria, partly after the Character in the 'A Song of Ice and Fire' series. Aria is a great namesake, she is willful, independent and focused. As a mother I aim to give Aria the opportunities I didn't have and try to help her be ready for an adult life that may be quite different to how we live now. I want her to have the confidence I have lacked and the ambition to do things with her life. I hope she will forgive me for buying her Meccano for Christmas when her friends have tiny tears dolls, for buying her the cute red, blue or green jumper or dress instead of the tacky pink crap that is persistently pushed on us by major companies. I hope she will forgive me for being uninterested in makeup and celebrities, 'women's' magazines and other 'women's' interests. For me, being a woman isn't for anyone else to define, to use to categorise me into a neat demographic pool. It is part of what makes me, me but it isn't the be all and end all of who i am. This is why, I believe in equality for women.

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Inequality has become less obvious, but it is still pervasive

I don't remember anyone telling me i couldn't become whatever I wanted to become as I grew up in the eighties and for that reason it has taken me a long time to realise that I was brought up unequal but as an adult looking back I realise i was gently moulded by those around me to become what they considered lady-like. I really hate that term 'lady-like'; It suggests that wanting to mess with computers, to get covered in mud playing sports, to have more interest in the engineering principles taught by Meccano and Lego than the humdrum life of your inanimate Barbie Doll is somehow inappropriate for a girl or lady. I have a one year old daughter of my own called Aria, partly after the Character in the 'A Song of Ice and Fire' series. Aria is a great namesake, she is willful, independent and focused. As a mother I aim to give Aria the opportunities I didn't have and try to help her be ready for an adult life that may be quite different to how we live now. I want her to have the confidence I have lacked and the ambition to do things with her life. I hope she will forgive me for buying her Meccano for Christmas when her friends have tiny tears dolls, for buying her the cute red, blue or green jumper or dress instead of the tacky pink crap that is persistently pushed on us by major companies. I hope she will forgive me for being uninterested in makeup and celebrities, 'women's' magazines and other 'women's' interests. For me, being a woman isn't for anyone else to define, to use to categorise me into a neat demographic pool. It is part of what makes me, me but it isn't the be all and end all of who i am. This is why, I believe in equality for women.

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Because we shouldn't have to explain why sexism is bad!

As someone working in the corporate world I am continually shocked by the lack of women in senior roles. I see people who have all the soft skills, qualities and knowledge, who do not rise to the seniority required. This is an obvious and quantifiable element of sexism, but it exists in far more subtle, difficult to measure forms. Why do we need sexual equality? Because everyone should get the same treatment no matter what their gender, race or background. Because we can only have the best society by letting people reach their full potential and to be rewarded properly. Because a fair society is a society where everyone feels that their hard work, ability and achievement is compensated. Because nobody should feel uncomfortable because of their gender. Because so much talent and ability is wasted as a result of sexism.

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Violence against women needs to be irradicated

Working for One25 - a charity that supports women trapped in street sex-work - I see women face poverty, addiction and violence on a daily basis. A party that wants to see an end to violence and give a voice to women who are to afraid to speak out certainly gets my support.

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I am a life long advocate of equality for women in all areas of life.

I am a 50+ Lesbian woman with a partner Ellen and 4 children ranging from their 30's to 6 years old. I have a degree in Politics and Sociology from Manchester, and have studied Gender Inequality in everything from Linguistics to Politics and all things in between. I am for my sins an ex member of the local executive of the Liberal Democrats, and was instrumental in getting the first ever LibDem Councillor elected to Doncaster council, producing all election literature. Oh my this is coming over awfully like a CV, I do apologise. I am very passionate about gender equality (as indeed I am about equality for all), I have dedicated much of my life to it, with little success often, though I have managed some firsts at university in particular. My most recent success at uni was in my final year (2006) when I became the chair of student council. In a university of over 30,000 students I was shockingly the first. I look forward to watching our fledgling party grow and develop, though when I say watch I hope to become much more proactive than that.

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Silent support is not enough

I'd like to *think* I've always been reasonably equality-minded, though I'm not going to claim that makes me innocent of occasional sexist behaviour myself. Over the last year or so, I've been increasingly aware of sexism as an issue - both in terms of how much action is needed, and how close we *might* be to a tipping point where things can actually change. Silently willing active feminists luck isn't sufficient for me any more; I want to be more actively involved, in whatever small way I can. I want to be an agent of change instead of just a witness to it. How can I tell my sons that sexism is wrong if I'm not prepared to stand up and be counted? I don't know how much good I can actually do, but at the very least I can stop being silent. As an aside, I hope more men join #WE to show that this isn't a struggle of all women against all men - it's a struggle of considerate people against a sexist culture which devalues women. There's no shame and no betrayal in a man being a feminist.

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I am a feminist

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I am WE because I hope for us to be heard, they are still tone deaf out there and abusively so

there is far too much to go into about my story but inequality is rife throughout all life. Just about every policy, system,concept used by government and business is full of extremist inequality and I want the abuse to stop now.

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The liberation of women is an essential part oft

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Universal equality is a fundamental step to human development

Universal equality and compassion allows for the possibility of awareness, empathy and peace to develop, for the benefit of all human beings.

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Because women are still less equal than men

I was raised to believe that men and women were born equal, and there was a time when I believed it. Now that I've reached my mid-thirties, and I can see I'm living in a society that is absolutely riddled with sexism. And I see other societies the world over where things are as bad, or worse. This needs to change, and the only way it will is if we take a stand.

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