#WeAreWE

#WeAreWE

The Women's Equality Party is a new collaborative force in British politics uniting people of all genders, diverse ages, backgrounds, ethnicities, beliefs and experiences in the shared determination to see women enjoy the same rights and opportunities as men so that all can flourish.

WE are here to give voice to all those who share our belief that equality is better for everyone.

Meet your fellow supporters and campaigners below and tell us why you are WE.

Please check your e-mail for a link to activate your account.

I am WE because I owe it to my daughter.

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Ask your father and brother if they truly support Equality

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I am WE because I need to live what I believe and because I can and I should !

I am tired of waiting for the existing system to address what it does not deem important . I am WE because I am still the teenage girl formed by the seventies who discovered injustice and was hurt by it … because I am tired being labeled ‘’aggressive’’ when the exact same behaviour is identified in men as strong, clear , or to the point ! BECAUSE my mother should have had a choice…..if she WANTED to stay home with her children that should have been valued….but as a choice , not as a lack of opportunity , because it is better for everyone in the world if all women have exactly the same chances in all areas of life that men have…..I am WE because if I don't , if WE don't who will ?

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No more living at 50%..men, time to change

No more living at 50% - women and men are equally valuable, and the world is better once that is recognised, accepted and we can all live a full, rich life. Men are the primary and majority offenders in the persistence of gender based inequality. Men have more responsibility to address this than the women affected by it. A man accepts his responsibility and acts upon it. I choose to be a man. I choose to seek the best - and the best comes from being able to access all. The efforts, wisdom, intelligence, creativity, faith, emotions, culture and attitudes of women and men in equal value. If as a man you have not yet realised this, but now do - be a man, act upon it. If as a man you were raised to believe in "men being better" or "men being more important" challenge those beliefs, try to validate them, do not accept them blindly for then you are little but an empty vessel leading a life based on mis-information If as a man you choose to believe in gender inequality - challenge yourself, ask yourself why. Are you scared of benefitting from all that the other 3,650,000,000 people on this planet have to offer? Do you recognise that women are better suited, better able...just plain better at some things than men? Could you accept that both genders are better at some things, but that we are equally valuable? Do not be fooled into thinking that gender inequality is better, gives you, a man, more opportunity. It doesn't. It gives you more chance to work, to exist in a smaller, sadder, less colourful, less efficient, less successful world. What on earth would any sane man choose that? It is time to be counted, this has lasted several thousand years too long. Men - think, realise, accept your responsibility and act upon it. Gender inequality must end now. Gavin

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Equality is my Martin Luther-King moment...

As A Domestic Abuse Consultant & Trainer I work & campaign on challenging belief systems & to affect changes in practice in every way I can. I engage locally, nationally & internationally. Doesn't matter where in the world gender based violence & oppression takes place, the outcome is the same. We are deemed as the most intelligent species on this planet - but it really doesn't feel it, especially in my areas of work. Peace & security in the home & beyond, positive representation as well as women's participation at all levels. This is the only way we can achieve equality in our homes, communities and country's. We have the tools to create equality for all, so lets work toward a better world for our next generations - both girls & boys

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Dealt with sexism all my life.

Despite coming from an equality-conscious family, I have experienced sexism in my personal and working life almost from day one. As a teenager I suffered domestic violence and emotional/psychological abuse at the hands of my first boyfriend. I was also subjected to sexist bullying at school. At work I have been sexually harassed, and in one instance it was actually insinuated by my boss that he might keep my colleague with the promise of my position because I would be 'having children soon'. I'm really lucky to have surrounded myself with wonderful people of all genders who live equality- but my experiences show that it the battle is far from won.

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Seriously, can it all get much worse? And who's to turn it around if not women?

Obviously, not all men are bad but I doubt that there's the critical mass of 'good' men to do what is needed to stop the trafficking, the violence against women, war on war, the rush to climate disaster. It would be good to see an international perspective in WEP's campaigning. Support for the RAWA is the best way to counter fundamentalism.

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Punishment for good choices?

I found my way here through a shared post on Facebook of the latest Huffpost article written by Vanessa Olorenshaw: So well written - a reminder why I'm so despondent with this new government and it's bulldozing way of going through the cuts to 'help' the country but forgetting the injured it's causing along the way. I CHOSE to be a single parent, yes, it was also a situation where I had no choice. Domestic violence vs doing it alone is not a choice. Saving my child is not a choice - it's an absolute, and as pitiful as it makes me feel and sound, I feel like the government is punishing me for that choice and reminding me that I am not valuable and I am invisible as long as I'm doing as I'm told. Going against the grain means this same group will get involved and should I still stay abstinent to its belief - then it will take control. Am I alone in feeling that something I am proud to have survived seems to be creeping it's way into my life in sheep's clothing? Could women really be truly deemed as equals? When the responsibility of the children are strongly weighted as our lot, rather than a privilege, why does it feel like a punishment when we happily step up to the plate? Not to mention the thousands of single mothers, for whatever reason, wearing both hats and baring the responsibility of everything alone phenomenally like juggling magicians, only to have the government rip the rug out from under them because they're seen as failures. 'Not good enough! Work more! Earn less! Shut up and do what you're told!'. Feels more like I've traded one abuser for another. It sounds very dramatic now that I've written it down but really? A number of us in private groups on Facebook are wondering what we can do and who we can write to in order to have our voices heard - so I've come here for some weight. That's my two cents anyway: back in your box Dawn!

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It is all about empowerment not entitlement

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#weAreWE The power of Women

The Women in my life are always survivors, resourceful, resilient, They are also strong, kind, compassionate, constantly evolving. Women have powerful energy that they pour into all aspects of their lives. Women nurture. Eve Ensler from Ted Talks encourages us as women to not compete against each other- to not judge- to not criticise. If we honour Women we honour life itself. I would like to live in a world where everyone's live is honoured, not quantified and controlled.

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Erika WE Swindon Branch Secretary

I'm a survivor of domestic abuse abuse and rape - two issues that affect so many women and yet most of us never get justice or support. Male violence is a huge problem that needs to be tackled before women can experience true equality and freedom. It's time to call politicians to account.

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For all our futures

My mum was a primary school head who brought 3 of us up single handedly after the death of my father. She is an inspiration, so smart, talented, dedicated and kind. Women are amazing. They bring so much to society yet they are overlooked , under represented and then derided for questioning why. For a better future, it time to celebrate and include women.

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Equal = Better.

joined because I recognised a shared belief that matched my own: Equality. And I was spurred to do so on the back of fresh disappointment with the results of the general election in May. I hope WE will achieve in shaping better lives and opportunities for women and consequently a better, more equal society in general.

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Fairness for All a goal worth standing up for

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I was actively involved in the women's movement of the '70's. Time to move forward again.

I feel society has been taking backward steps in the past decades. I was involved in setting up a women's refuge previously.

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Why are care givers not seen as heroes ?

Many years ago I studied anthropology and learned that 'jobs' had status in most societies when they were predominantly done by men! Is this why there are few stories where the hero is a women providing care? I would like to see care giving obtain the same status as being a Judge or a member of the cabinet, only then would we have true equality.

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Better society for everyone

It is all good on paper, the policies are improving in addressing the gender equality. However, the real environment is not encouraging at all. We are living in a society where it is acceptable for women to be paid less, our voices to be void and our abilities to be underestimated. I am expecting my first child. I want my child to be raised in a society where her/his chances for a better life will not depend on the gender. I am pleased to see the establishment of a political party that understands our needs and will truly stand for our rights.

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A report was written about me when I was six. It described me as a feminist.

When I was 6 I insisted on being called George and being seen to be a boy. I was a misogynist. I hated that in all the stories - books, films and TV programmes, women and girls were the sickly, the carers, the cooks and ALWAYS (even the wonderful Cally in Blake 7) being rescued by men and boys. I wanted to be the rescuer, the hero of my story, and how on earth could I do that as a girl? Now of course I am proud of my gender and of all the women who have fought, often literally, for my right to vote, work, be respected and live safely. But WE have so much more to do. I am so excited that WE are a political party striving to release everyone from the confines of gender stereotypes, and allow all people to realise their full potential without being shackled to outmoded and repressive notions of gender.

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Seize power, and we can succeed!

How long have women been seeking equal treatment? It is high time we reinvigorated the fight that led to the Suffragette movement and the feminism of the 60s. STILL women have not achieved equality, even though much legislation has changed. It is high time for our own political party.

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Published and promoted by Hannah Peaker on behalf of the Women's Equality Party
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